Poplar Bluff Garden Club

Poplar Bluff Garden Club

 
Home
Crepe Myrtles
Birds
Community
Contact

 

Southeast District Federated Garden Clubs of Missouri on Facebook

Click on Above Link to Become a Fan

 

Crepe Myrtle Project

 

In 2000, the Poplar Bluff Garden Club commenced on a new, very large project with the expectations of making Poplar Bluff recognized for its Crepe Myrtles. They are asking their residents to plant "Red" crepe myrtles where ever and as many as they can. (If this color is not available, any color will do). They actually prefer our poor soil and will thrive in our sunny, rocky environment. They need Full Sun and good drainage. When established, they are drought resistant (good for our hot, dry summers) and do not need to be fertilized. Do not fertilize them when you plant.

The crepe myrtle is a long flowering summer shrub. In 2000, the Poplar Bluff Garden Club commenced on a new, very large project with the expectations of making Poplar Bluff recognized for its Crepe Myrtles. They are asking their residents to plant "Red" crepe myrtles where ever and as many as they can. (If this color is not available, any color will do). They actually prefer our poor soil and will thrive in our sunny, rocky environment. They need Full Sun and good drainage. When established, they are drought resistant (good for our hot, dry summers) and do not need to be fertilized. Do not fertilize them when you plant.

The crepe myrtle is a long flowering summer shrub and is fairly hardy in SE Missouri. If you stick with the varieties listed below you will have more success with not getting mildew, the one thing to which they are susceptible. Insects don't bother them.

The flowers grow on this years growth, so go ahead and cut them back hard in the spring and if they die back to the roots, from a hard winter, don't worry, they'll pop back from the roots.

Best time to plant? In the fall, at least 8 weeks before the soil temperature falls to 40 degrees or in the spring before the long hot, dry summer, so their roots will have time to establish.

They are named after their crinkly leaves, like crepe paper and their botanical name is Lagerstromia Indica because they are native to India or were first discovered there.

Variety Name Flower Color Growth Habit Mildew Resist First Flower Bloom Days
Mature Height 2' Tall
Chickasaw
Lavender Miniature Very Mid July 70
Pokomoke Deep Rose Miniature Very Early July 70
Mature Height 5' to 10' Tall
Acoma White Spreads High Late June 70
Hopi Medium Pink Spreads High Late June 80
Pecos Medium Pink Low Globe High Early July 80
Tonto Red Globe High Mid July 55 Best Choice
Zuni Med Lavender Globe High Early July 80
Height in 10 to 15 years 10' to 20' Tall
Comanche Coral Pink Broad High Late June 90
Osage Clear Pink Pendulous High Early July 60
Sioux Medium Pink Upright High Late July 70
Tuskegee Dark Pink Spreading High Late June 80
Yuma Medium Lavender Upright High Late July 70
Height in 10 to 15 years 20' or Taller
Biloxi Pale Pink Vase High Early July 60
Choctaw Bright Pink Vase High Mid July 70
Miami Dark Pink Upright High Early July

80

Muskogee Lt Lavender Broad Tall High Mid June 100
Natchez White Broad Tall High Mid June 90
Tuscarora Dark Pink Broad Vase High Early July 50
Wichita Lavender Vase High Early July 90